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Getting to Zero: World AIDS Day advocacy

2011 December 1
by Family Care International

Today, on World AIDS Day 2011, Family Care International has partnered with Save the Children to help policymakers across Africa understand and act on the urgent need to eliminate new HIV infections among children, and to provide comprehensive HIV services for their mothers.

Three decades into the AIDS pandemic, new HIV infections among children are virtually zero in high income countries. Yet in middle and low-income countries, an estimated 370,000 children were born with the HIV virus in 2009, while 60,000 pregnant women died because of HIV. “This is unacceptable. Urgent and exceptional efforts should be made to eliminate new infections among children and to keep their mothers alive,” said Thomas J. McCormack and Fatimata Kané, Country Directors in Mali for Save the Children and FCI, respectively, in a joint statement supporting the Getting to Zero campaign to eliminate new HIV infections. “Save the Children and FCI agree: Getting to zero is possible in Mali and in countries across Africa.”

Photo: UNAIDS/Getting to Zero

With over 2.5 million children and 1.4 million pregnant women living with HIV, action must be taken to ensure the survival of children and mothers. Weak health systems, insufficient numbers of health workers, limited health financing, and inadequate focus on health issues within national development frameworks all must be addressed urgently in order to save women’s lives, protect their health, and help them avoid passing on the virus to their children. This requires action by governments, in partnership with the private sector and development partners.

FCI and Save the Children are joining UNAIDS and a global coalition of NGOs in supporting the Global Plan Towards Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive.  The Global Plan has two important targets:

  • Reduce the number of new HIV infections among children by 90%
  • Reduce the number of AIDS-related maternal deaths by 50%.

African leaders have made a number of commitments to address HIV/AIDS among women and children, most recently at the United Nations High Level Meeting on AIDS in June, 2011, when the Global Plan was launched.

In Mali, Burkina Faso, and Kenya, FCI is working, in collaboration with many partners, to hold policymakers accountable for keeping these promises.  Increased efforts to eliminate new infections for children and keep their mothers alive are crucial to improving child survival and maternal health, and to achieving Millennium Development Goals 4, 5 and 6. FCI is proud to partner with Save the Children and other advocates around the world on World AIDS Day to urge policy makers and donors to help us “get to zero.”

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