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Sexual and reproductive health and rights beyond 2015: UN concludes negotiations on sustainable development agenda (Arabic)

2015 August 28
by Family Care International

This article is also available in English, Spanish and French.

أخذت المفاوضات الحكومية الدولية النهائية على جدول أعمال التنمية لما بعد عام 2015 في نيويورك في الفترة من 20-31 يوليو، 2015 وبلغت المناقشات ذروتها في اعتماد “تحويل عالمنا: جدول أعمال 2030 للتنمية المستدامة” من قبل 193 دولة من الدول الأعضاء، مساء الاحد 2 أغسطس بعد فترة طويلة و مفاوضات شاقة.

دعي ممثلي الشبكات الإقليمية للصحة الإنجابية و الجنسية من جميع أنحاء العالم، جنبا إلى جنب مع صندوق الأمم المتحدة للسكان، بلا كلل في هذه المفاوضات – كما لدينا في كل الدورات السابقة التفاوض الحكومية الدولية – لضمان أن جدول أعمال ما بعد 2015 ويضمن حقوق الإنسان، لا سيما من SRHR كل الناس في كل مكان. يجلب المساواة بين الجنسين في صدارة؛ يعترف دور الشباب كعوامل رئيسية من التغيير؛ ويشمل ذلك المشاركة الفعالة للمجتمع المدني في تشكيل التنمية العالمية، على الصعيدين القطري والعالمي.

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Santé et droits sexuels et reproductifs l’après-2015

2015 August 28
by Family Care International

Disponible en anglais, espagnol et arabe

Les dernières négociations intergouvernementales sur l’élaboration de l’ordre du jour de l’après-2015 se sont tenues à New York du 20 au 31 juillet 2015 et ont abouti à l’adoption par 193 États Membres de Transformer notre monde : Ordre du jour de 2030 pour le développement durable le dimanche 2 août au soir, après de longues négociations difficiles. De concert avec l’UNFPA, les représentants des réseaux régionaux de santé et droits sexuels et reproductifs du monde entier ont infatigablement plaidé durant ces négociations – comme nous l’avons fait au cours de chacune des sessions précédentes des négociations intergouvernementales – pour veiller à ce que l’ordre du jour de l’après-2015 garantisse les droits humains, notamment la santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs de tous les individus où qu’ils soient, place l’égalité des sexes au premier plan, reconnaisse le rôle des jeunes en tant que principaux agents du changement et inclue la participation active de la société civile à forger le développement mondial, tant au niveau national qu’au niveau international.

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La salud y los derechos sexuales y reproductivos después de 2015: ONU concluye las negociaciones de la agenda de desarrollo sostenible

2015 August 28
by Family Care International

También disponible en ingles, frances y árabe.

Entre el 20 y 31 de julio de 2015, se llevaron a cabo las negociaciones finales entre los gobiernos en torno a la agenda de desarrollo post 2015 en Nueva York. Estas culminaron el domingo 2 de agosto con la adopción del documento de consenso: Transformar nuestro mundo: la agenda de desarrollo sostenible 2030, por parte de 193 Estados Parte, luego largas y arduas negociaciones.

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Sexual and reproductive health and rights beyond 2015: UN concludes negotiations on sustainable development agenda

2015 August 28
by Family Care International

This article is also available in Spanish, French, and Arabic.

The final intergovernmental negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda took place in New York July 20-31, 2015 culminating in the adoption of Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development by 193 Member States on Sunday evening, August 2 after long and arduous negotiations. Representatives of regional sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) networks from around the world, together with UNFPA, advocated tirelessly at these negotiations–as we have during each of the previous intergovernmental negotiation sessions–to ensure that the post-2015 agenda guarantees human rights, particularly the SRHR of all people everywhere; brings gender equality to the forefront; recognizes young people’s role as key agents of change; and includes the active participation of civil society in shaping global development, both at country and global levels.

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Interview with Sékou Traoré, peer educator

2015 August 12
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Sékou Traoré, 26, became one of FCI Mali’s youth peer educators, or un educateur-leadeur, two years ago. He works as a mechanic at a garage in Bamako, making him one of many Malian youths who work in the economy’s informal sector. Youth in the informal sector have been, and remain, difficult to reach with health awareness and advocacy messages, because they take jobs rather than attend school where these youth health messages are concentrated.

While Sékou maintains his job, he works for FCI as a peer educator as often as time allows, sometimes once a week for a few hours, and sometimes two or three times a week. Sékou dedicates most of his free time to FCI.

Sekou Traore

Photo by Catherine Lalonde

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Sharing strategies for integrating maternal and newborn care: Strengthening the continuum

2015 May 22
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By Amy Boldosser-Boesch and Mary Kinney

Amy Boldosser-Boesch, is Interim President and CEO of Family Care International (FCI) and Mary Kinney is Specialist with Save the Children, Saving Newborn Lives. This post originally appeared on the Healthy Newborn Network blog.

The global health community gathered on Tuesday evening, May 19 to recognize the importance of integrating maternal and newborn care and to celebrate the release of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) Progress Report May 2015 and Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). The side session at the 68th World Health Assembly Integrating maternal and newborn care: Strengthening the continuum was standing room only as a panel of champions for integration of maternal and newborn health took the stage. Co-sponsored by the Governments of Malawi and Cameroon, this event was planned with the support of a wide range of partners.*

Panelists give remarks at the Sharing Strategies for Integrating Maternal and Newborn Care: Strengthening the continuum side event in Geneva. Photo: PMNCH

Panelists give remarks at the Sharing Strategies for Integrating Maternal and Newborn Care: Strengthening the continuum side event in Geneva. Photo: PMNCH

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Misoprostol for treatment of postpartum hemorrhage added to WHO Essential Medicines List

2015 May 15
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Shafia Rashid is senior program officer for Global Advocacy at Family Care International.

For more than five years, FCI has been working with Gynuity Health Projects and other partners to build the evidence base for expanded availability and use of misoprostol for the prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). PPH is the leading cause of maternal death, and misoprostol is a safe, effective medicine that is especially practical in low-resource settings, because it is available as a tablet and does not require refrigeration or injection.

This week marked an important milestone in global efforts to make misoprostol available to the women who need it, as the World Health Organization (WHO) approved its inclusion on the Model List of Essential Medicines (EML) for the treatment of PPH. Misoprostol was included on the EML for prevention of PPH in 2011, and the recent decision signifies WHO’s full endorsement of misoprostol as an essential maternal health medicine in settings where oxytocin — which requires cold storage and intravenous injection — is not available or cannot be used safely. The WHO Expert Committee for the Selection and Use of Essential Medicines, a panel that meets every two years to update the EML, recommended that misoprostol be listed for the additional indication of treating PPH[1] and retained on the list for prevention of PPH. read more…

Calling for an integrated approach to maternal and newborn health: Strategies toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality

2015 May 15
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Amy Boldosser-Boesch is Interim President and CEO of Family Care International. This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.

Next week at the 68th World Health Assembly, the Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM)Working Group — led by WHO in partnership with Family Care International (FCI), the Maternal Health Task Force, UNICEF, UNFPA, USAID, the Maternal Child Survival Program, and the White Ribbon Alliance — will launch its much-anticipated report, Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). For FCI and our partners, this report presents an important opportunity to highlight the critical linkages between the health of a woman and that of her newborn baby. read more…

Maternal health takes the spotlight at the World Health Assembly

2015 May 12
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By Rima Jolivet, Maternal Health Consultant, MHTF

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.

In an important development for the global maternal health community, the long-awaited Strategies toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) will be launched at the 68th World Health Assembly, at an event hosted by Cameroon and Malawi and co-sponsored by the contributors to the Every Newborn Action Plan.

This event marks the culmination of over two years of consensus work and collaboration with multiple stakeholders that began in January 2013. The EPMM Working Group—led by the WHO in partnership with MHTF, UNICEF, UNFPA, USAID, Family Care International, Maternal Child Survival Program (MCSP), and White Ribbon Alliance—has stewarded the process to gather key inputs and consult widely with a broad range of stakeholders to develop the ambitious yet feasible targets for ending preventable maternal deaths within a generation, and to identify the strategic priorities and actions necessary for achieving this vision. The strategies are presented in full in the EPMM report that has been recently published by the World Health Organization. The EPMM targets were included as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan resolution at last year’s World Health Assembly. read more…

The economic and social impacts of maternal death  

2015 May 5
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Guest post by Tezeta Tulloch, communications manager at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University. This post originally appeared on the BMC Blog.

What happens when a mother dies? In the West, the most ready and obvious answer is grief – the harrowing emotional and psychological toll of losing a loved one. A mother’s death is largely viewed as a private tragedy that will grow more manageable in time.

But in many developing countries, a mother’s death is much more than an emotional crisis, often leading to long-term social and economic breakdown, both for her immediate family and the wider community. This topic is explored in new depth, in a special issue launched today in Reproductive Health (an open-access journal).

“The True Cost of Maternal Death: Individual Tragedy Impacts Family, Community and Nations” focuses exclusively on the immediate and longer-term effects of maternal death on surviving children, households, and communities. It features seven studies, with data drawn from four African countries – Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa.

The research was conducted by two research groups, one led by Harvard’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, and the other a consortium made up of Family Care International, the International Center for Research on Women, and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)-CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration. The results provide hard evidence that a mother’s loss can devastate the livelihoods, quality of life, and survival chances of those she leaves behind.

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The supplement features seven studies, with data drawn from four African countries – Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa. Photo via Pixabay

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Supporting midwives for a better tomorrow

2015 May 4
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Martha Murdock is Vice President for Regional Programs at Family Care International.

Midwives save lives. It’s as simple as that. But the obstacles and barriers midwives face are anything but simple.

We all know that midwives have crucial clinical skills that help them care for women and their newborns everyday all over the world. If these lifesaving services were available and accessible to all the women and babies who need them, midwives could help avert two-thirds of the nearly 300,000 maternal deaths and half of the 3 million newborn deaths that occur every year. Midwives play an absolutely critical role in making progress on Millennium Development Goals 4 (reducing child mortality) and 5 (improving maternal health and achieving universal access to reproductive health). And without a well-supported, trained, and supplied midwifery cadre, we won’t be able to meet the maternal and child health targets that will be part of the post-2015 agenda. We’re delighted to join our colleagues at the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) in celebrating the International Day of the Midwife today, 5 May. read more…

African youth amplify their voices at CPD

2015 April 21
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by Family Care International

By Kigen Korir, National Programme Coordinator, SRHR Alliance in Kenya; Hellen Owino, Advocacy Officer, Centre for the Study of Adolescents in Kenya; and Lara van Kouterik, Senior Programme Officer SRHR, Simavi in The Netherlands

We have the largest generation of young people ever.

The world must listen to young people’s voices. It must ensure that we have the opportunity to influence policies that affect us, especially in setting the new development agenda for the era beyond 2015. It must understand that young people know what they want and need, and are committed to safeguarding their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).

Too often, the voices of young people are drowned out by those of adult policymakers who think they know what young people need and assume young people are “too young” to articulate their issues effectively. For many years, these assumptions have limited the opportunities and constricted the space for young people to participate meaningfully in the creation of the development programs and policies that will have a direct impact on their lives.

At a recent side event during the Commission on Population and Development, young people voiced their concerns, shared best practices, and discussed key issues with other stakeholders. The event was hosted by Simavi (an NGO based in the Netherlands), the permanent mission of Ghana to the UN, and SRHR Alliances from Ghana, Kenya, Uganda, and Malawi, and was attended by representatives, including youth, from country delegations; SRHR advocates; policy makers; and young people.

Aisha Twalibu of YECE Malawi

Aisha Twalibu of YECE Malawi

“Involving young people in SRHR is a basic right enshrined in the laws of many countries, and it is therefore incumbent for countries to observe the same,” explained Edith Asamani, a youth representative from Curious Minds Ghana.

Aisha Twalibu, a youth representative from YECE in Malawi, explained to the group that young people are a diverse group with different needs, and that listening to their voices will help governments, CSOs and development agencies tailor SRHR programs to their needs.

Three other young Africans shared case studies on youth SRHR programs. First, Chris Kyewe from Family Life Education Programme described his peer education program in Uganda, in which youth peer educators (YPEs) are trained to give SRHR information and education to their peers and refer young people to local health centers where trained healthcare providers offer youth-friendly services. In addition to education, YPEs also provide their peers with condoms and oral contraceptive pills, together with instructions on how to use them. This example showed how young people are meaningfully engaged in the implementation of the program.

Then Hellen Owino from the Centre for the Study of Adolescents in Kenya shared that comprehensive sexuality education programs in Kenya empower young people to make informed choices about their health and sexuality. CSA and the Kenya SRHR Alliance have been engaged in advocacy to include comprehensive sexuality education in the national curriculum of Kenya. She also shared that CSE programs should be appealing and interactive, for example by using ICT and social media, to capture the attention of young people. Justine Saidi, the Principal Secretary for Youth in Malawi also called for the active involvement of parents in demanding that young people have access to sexuality information.

Charles Banda from YONECO shared the last case study that focused on preventing child marriage in Malawi. He shared his experience in working with youth-led organizations to build awareness on the negative impact of child marriages on girls and communities, creating a more enabling environment for young girls to exercise their rights. He also described how civil society organizations in Malawi have advocated successfully to raise the legal age of marriage to 18 years, which was recently made into law by the President of Malawi.

Highlighting lessons from the women’s movement, the side event concluded with a discussion of key strategies for youth advocates, including:

  • Mobilizing a critical mass of young people
  • Holding governments accountable for fulfilling their national and international commitments
  • Investing in ensuring that health data can be disaggregated by age group, especially for young people aged 10 to 14
  • Identifying champions at all levels to advance the youth and SRHR agenda

It is time that young people’s views and concerns are incorporated into the new development agenda. Without listening to young people, no country will be able to realize the potential of the demographic dividend that comes with this generation.

 

 

 

Managing postpartum hemorrhage at home deliveries in Chitral, Pakistan

2015 April 17
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By Meagan Byrne, Program Assistant, Gynuity Health Projects

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.

In Chitral district of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP) Province, Pakistan, a high rate of home births translates to inadequate or nonexistent treatment for life-threatening obstetric complications, like postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). According to the 2012-13 Pakistan DHS report, nearly two-thirds of women deliver at home in rural areas of KP province.

Customarily, home births are managed by a traditional birth attendant (TBA) and if a complication like PPH arises, the only care available is to transfer the woman to a higher level facility or have a skilled provider called to the woman’s home to administer oxytocin as treatment. In Chitral, many villages are located far from health centers and access to care is especially difficult due to poor infrastructure and limited transport. Faced with these barriers, women who develop PPH are rarely transferred to a facility, so having treatment options available at home is critical.

Misoprostol, a prostaglandin analog that reduces blood loss after delivery, is a useful drug in this setting because it requires neither cold storage nor a skilled attendant to administer it. A recent study—implemented in Chitral by Gynuity Health Projects and Aga Khan Health Service, Pakistan—explored the feasibility of providing misoprostol to traditional birth attendants and having them administer it to prevent and treat PPH in home deliveries.

In this study, women received misoprostol prophylaxis (a 3-tablet dose) and in the event of PPH, the TBA administered a treatment dose of misoprostol with referral to a higher level of care. Study trainings reiterated the importance of transfer if a woman experiences a delivery complication. Despite prophylaxis, there were women who were diagnosed with PPH and received study treatment. The study confirmed that TBAs are able to administer misoprostol correctly and safely for both prophylaxis and treatment.

There has been an increase in the number of facility-based deliveries worldwide; yet for many women, a facility delivery is not an option. Among women in our study who had planned to have a facility delivery, many delivered at home due to road blocks, unavailable transportation, or unavailability of a family member to accompany them to the facility.

There will always be women who will not be able to deliver at a facility, despite plan to do so. Among women who deliver at home and experience PPH, many will experience delays or will never be transferred to a health facility. For these women, it is imperative to have a treatment option available at the community level since the average time from onset of PPH to death is only two hours.

The following video showcases infrastructure barriers to safe delivery and expresses the thoughts of TBAs and other healthcare providers on access to obstetric services in Chitral and the use of misoprostol to manage PPH.

 

This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies CaucusFamily Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.

Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage: translating promise into reality

2015 April 17
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By Melissa Wanda, Advocacy Officer, Family Care International – Kenya

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Taskforce blog.

In Kenya, where I work as an advocate for women’s health and rights, women continue to die during pregnancy and childbirth at alarming rates. Approximately 25% of these deaths are due to heavy bleeding following childbirth, also known as postpartum hemorrhage or PPH. More than half of women deliver at home; that proportion can be even higher in some counties with limited infrastructure and predominantly rural populations. Even in cases where a woman arrives to a health facility in time, she can still face significant barriers to receive the care she needs:

  • supplies needed for childbirth—such as a blood pressure cuff or clean gloves—may not be available;
  • essential medicines—such as oxytocin or misoprostol, which can prevent or treat postpartum bleeding—may be in short supply; and
  • a skilled health provider may not be present to provide the care a woman needs to have a safe delivery.

A key strategy for improving maternal health is to ensure that every woman has access to effective medicines to prevent and treat PPH during childbirth. Oxytocin and misoprostol are proven, lifesaving medicines for the prevention and treatment of PPH. Misoprostol offers a number of advantages for women living in remote, rural areas: misoprostol does not need refrigeration, is available in tablet form and can, therefore, be administered with no specialized equipment or skills. Misoprostol provides an effective option for preventing and treating PPH in settings such as homes and health facilities lacking electricity, refrigeration and IV equipment.

For these reasons, Kenya’s Ministry of Health established a national-level task force to provide a common forum for addressing policy-level issues related to the use of misoprostol for the prevention and treatment of PPH. While misoprostol is registered in Kenya for the management of PPH, and national guidelines govern its use, studies have shown that misoprostol’s procurement and availability in public health facilities is irregular and inconsistent.

This national, multi-stakeholder task force—composed of government, NGO, research, faith-based and health profession representatives[1]—was tasked with spearheading access to and use of misoprostol for PPH. Beginning in 2014, the Misoprostol Task Force, convened by the ministry of health, met regularly to identify the key policy gaps at the national level and to take concrete action. Key policy priorities identified by the Task Force:

  • Harmonize the national clinical guidelines:  Kenya has numerous clinical management guidelines advising health professionals on how to administer misoprostol for all its indications (PPH, induction of labor and post-abortion care): the 2009 Clinical Guidelines for Management and Referral of Common Conditions at Levels 4-6 and the 2012 National Guidelines for Quality Obstetric and Perinatal Care. While these guidelines recommend the use of misoprostol to prevent and treat PPH when oxytocin is unavailable, they do not reflect the latest evidence and were inconsistent with each other. The Task Force developed a handout that harmonizes these different guidelines and produced a job aid for health workers. Both documents are waiting approval by the ministry of health; once approved, they will be disseminated at the national and sub-national/county levels.
  • Revise the national essential medicine list: While the Kenya Essential Medicine List(KEML, 2010) classifies misoprostol as a complementary and core[2] oxytocic drug, no specification is made for its use in PPH prevention or treatment. The Task Force drafted a letter to the National Medicines and Therapeutics Committee, to call for the addition of misoprostol to the KEML for PPH prevention and treatment at all levels of the health system. This letter will likely be deliberated by the committee when it meets this year to update the KEML.

Continued advocacy is still needed to ensure these positive developments in the Kenyan national policy framework translate into actual improvements in the availability and use of misoprostol. The Task Force has served as a critical forum for bringing together key stakeholders, promoting national level discussion and supporting effective action.

For more information and tools for conducting effective advocacy:

Scaling up Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Moving from Evidence to Action

Advocacy, Approval, Access: Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage A Guide for Effective Advocacy

This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies CaucusFamily Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.

[1] Membership includes representatives from the Ministry of Health-Reproductive Maternal Health Services Unit, Family Care International-Kenya, PATH, Management Sciences for Health, the Population Council, UNFPA, AMREF, Institute of Family Medicine (INFAMED), Christian Health Association of Kenya (CHAK), Jhpiego, the World Health Organization and professional organizations of gynecologists and nurses.

[2] The Core List represents the priority needs for the health care system. Medicines on the Core List are considered to be the most efficacious, safe and cost‐effective; are expected to be routinely available in health facilities; and should be affordable to the majority of the population.  Complimentary medicines are essential medicines needed for specialized diagnostic or monitoring facilities, and/or specialist medical care, and/or specialist training.

Let’s reward the use of maternal health supplies

2015 April 10
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By Milka Dinev, LAC Forum Regional Advisor, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition 

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force blog.

During a donor visit to Peru in the year 2000, a maternal health supporter and friend saw that rural women in Peru were suffering and dying because they lacked access to safe maternal health services during the critical hours of childbirth. This young donor had recently had her children, so she decided to reward the unsung heroes who made extraordinary efforts to save the lives of women during childbirth. It would be the “Oscar” of maternal health and survival.

The Sarah Faith Award was created to promote and reward the extraordinary efforts made by health providers and communities to save the lives of mothers and their children. For ten years, this award provided funding and technical assistance to the health teams and communities that had demonstrated teamwork and solidarity. Most cases were heroic efforts – transporting a mother to a rural health facility on the shoulders of four or five men using a stretcher made of wood and blankets (or in a boat along the Amazon River) or a doctor/nurse giving his or her own blood for a much-needed transfusion. The award honored deserving teams with US$25,000 to improve their health facilities or their community services. This award was an extraordinary tool to improve morale among health providers and health promoters. Each winning team received a beautiful statue that they prominently displayed in their facility.

Yet, it is worthwhile to observe that an important selection criterion for the Sarah Faith Award is how applicants improved access to maternal health services. So what happens to women who do not have access to such heroes as the ones the Sarah Faith prize rewards? I do believe this is where supplies come into play, carrying out a crucial, lifesaving role. How many lives could be saved if pregnant women had free access to misoprostol in order to prevent postpartum hemorrhage during their home delivery, or if the nurse in the health facility could administer magnesium sulfate to women with pre-eclampsia to control their blood pressure? How many lives could be saved if oxytocin supplies were adequately refrigerated?

Arguably, services — with their immediate human element — make for better story-telling a lot of the time. And good storytelling is a mainstay of the marketing and publicity that surround award mechanisms. And by comparison, supplies often carry rather sterile connotations of warehouses, supply chains, and transportation.

Working at the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, I am often struck by the challenge of even finding a photo that adequately tells the supplies story. And yes, there is a supplies story however, there is no “supplies award”. There is very little we do in promoting morale and engagement among those that work to make supplies available, accessible and  affordable within a framework of quality and equity!

As far as maternal health supplies go, it is easy for groups to forget the role of the three key life-saving commodities and therefore fail to prioritize their presence in health facilities 100% of the time. Much of the assistance provided through the Sarah Faith Award was directed to the direct provision of these commodities: a good fridge for the oxytocin (and vaccines of course) and a training package to update providers on the use, dosage and storage of these supplies.

The Family Planning Community has this saying “no product no program”. It is time to start using a similar phrase that includes maternal health supplies as part of a holistic approach to safe motherhood.

 

This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies CaucusFamily Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.